How a Pet can Help Children’s Studies

Whether it be a cat, dog or fish, animals can bring an abundance of love into any home. Combine this with a young, learning child and the cognitive benefits of one small furry hug can too be abundant.

We often hear of people discussing an individual’s IQ. IQ means ‘Intelligence Quotient.’ It’s a score devised from tests and activities that are meant to predict one’s intelligence. But how often do we discuss one’s EQ? Their Emotional Quotient? Just like an IQ, an EQ tells of our emotional intelligence; the ability to respond and identify emotions. A student’s EQ is said to be linked to academic success and having a furry friend around is just the help a student needs to nurture it.

In having something to care for, students can develop a sense of empathy. Students can identify a living being that also has needs, which is something they can help fulfil. Simple tasks like filling up the dog’s water bottle, maintaining the kitty litter or remember to feed the fish can help promote empathy.

Whilst some Disney shows and movies would have us believe that pets can talk, I’ve never seen it. As the reputable source that I am, I’m pretty confident that although I’ve never seen it, my dog only communicates through barks and a wiggly tail. Students learning that social cues may not always be verbal or spoken is another way a pet can enhance a student’s EQ.

Just like with empathy, students carry out the mundane tasks to ensure that the pet’s needs are met. In doing this, students can feel a sense of responsibility. If the water bowl is not full at the beginning of the day, their pet will go without water for the rest of the day. Indicating these needs and handing over the responsibility for tasks students can complete, allows students to build a more emotional connection and bond with the pet.

This responsibility of a pet in their hands can also bring about a new sense of confidence. In having something depend upon the student, self-esteem will be enhanced. This new sense of confidence and a stronger sense of self-esteem translates into the classroom. Teachers and tutors may see a more motivated and driven student knowing their pet is at home waiting for them.

The comfort of a furry cuddle is always relaxing. The quiet hum of their purring or the patter of the tail can make anyone calm. So, for students, having a furry and cuddly outlet to destress with or even vent to, can ease anxiety.

A big EQ means a better and bigger IQ. If all it takes for a big EQ is for a furry friend to come along with a wiggly tail, why not introduce a pet into a student’s environment?

Whether it be a cat, dog or fish, animals can bring an abundance of love into any home. Combine this with a young, learning child and the cognitive benefits of one small furry hug can too be abundant.

We often hear of people discussing an individual’s IQ. IQ means ‘Intelligence Quotient.’ It’s a score devised from tests and activities that are meant to predict one’s intelligence. But how often do we discuss one’s EQ? Their Emotional Quotient? Just like an IQ, an EQ tells of our emotional intelligence; the ability to respond and identify emotions. A student’s EQ is said to be linked to academic success and having a furry friend around is just the help a student needs to nurture it.

In having something to care for, students can develop a sense of empathy. Students can identify a living being that also has needs, which is something they can help fulfil. Simple tasks like filling up the dog’s water bottle, maintaining the kitty litter or remember to feed the fish can help promote empathy.

Whilst some Disney shows and movies would have us believe that pets can talk, I’ve never seen it. As the reputable source that I am, I’m pretty confident that although I’ve never seen it, my dog only communicates through barks and a wiggly tail. Students learning that social cues may not always be verbal or spoken is another way a pet can enhance a student’s EQ.

Just like with empathy, students carry out the mundane tasks to ensure that the pet’s needs are met. In doing this, students can feel a sense of responsibility. If the water bowl is not full at the beginning of the day, their pet will go without water for the rest of the day. Indicating these needs and handing over the responsibility for tasks students can complete, allows students to build a more emotional connection and bond with the pet.

This responsibility of a pet in their hands can also bring about a new sense of confidence. In having something depend upon the student, self-esteem will be enhanced. This new sense of confidence and a stronger sense of self-esteem translates into the classroom. Teachers and tutors may see a more motivated and driven student knowing their pet is at home waiting for them.

The comfort of a furry cuddle is always relaxing. The quiet hum of their purring or the patter of the tail can make anyone calm. So, for students, having a furry and cuddly outlet to destress with or even vent to, can ease anxiety.

A big EQ means a better and bigger IQ. If all it takes for a big EQ is for a furry friend to come along with a wiggly tail, why not introduce a pet into a student’s environment?